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Sold Out: Tracing Consequences in Fiction led by Brandon Taylor

$495

8 Sessions

Out of stock

Once a week Tuesdays, 6:30 pm EDT - 8:30 pm EDT July 21 to September 8, 2020

This workshop is at capacity. To join the waitlist, please email Thierry Kehou at thierry@centerforfiction.org.


In my work as an editor, I have found that what most often separates exceptional stories from good stories is the author’s attention and care to the consequences of their characters’ actions.

By attending to the downstream effects of character choices, an author can derive tension and urgency from almost any narrative scenario. Consequences are the companions to stakes. Characters reveal themselves through their actions, but consequences are what give a story meaning and shape. Consequences allow the world of the story to respond to the characters who move within it. By tracing out the consequences of our characters’ decisions and actions, we can add both narrative and moral depth, getting at difficult and nuanced truths.

In this workshop, we will hold stories accountable to the stakes they set for themselves. We will read each story closely, and develop a rigorous and generous framework by which it can be understood. And in applying that framework, we will, hopefully, push these stories into more uncomfortable, but truthful configurations.


This workshop will take place online via Zoom. Participants will receive instructions for access prior to the first session.

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Led by

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    Brandon Taylor

    Brandon Taylor

    Brandon Taylor is the author of the novel Real Life, which was a New York Times Editors’ Choice. His work has appeared in Guernica, American Short Fiction, Gulf Coast, Buzzfeed Reader, O: The Oprah Magazine, Gay Mag, the New Yorker online, the Literary Review, and elsewhere. He is the senior editor of Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading and a staff writer at Lit Hub. He holds graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was an Iowa Arts Fellow.