JOIN NOW > CONTRIBUTE >

GET OUR UPDATES

This is Not a Novel

Thursday March 2, 2017
07:00 pm

Tags: Event

 

Inspired by one of David Markson's late works of fiction, this panel invites authors of non-traditional fictions to discuss their work, writing processes, inspirations, and motivations. Such hybrid forms are books that mix fiction and non-fiction, books that employ intertextuality, that use research and the documentary impulse in some way, or involve the intermixing both lyrical and more prose-like approaches. With Laurie Sheck, David Shields, Shelley Jackson and Wayne Koestenbaum. Moderated by Lucy Ives.

 


 

Laurie Sheck is the author of the hybrid work, A Monster’s Notes, and Island of the Mad (Counterpoint, December 2016) as well as five books of poems. Her work has appeared in numerous publications including the New Yorker, the New York Times, and the Paris Review. She has been a recent fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard and the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, and has been the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Ingram Merrill Foundation, among others. Her work has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Dublin International Impac Award.

 

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger (named one of the best books of 2010 by more than thirty publications), The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead (a New York Times bestseller), and Black Planet (finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award), War Is Beautiful (powerHouse, 2015); The recipient of Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, Shields has published essays and stories in the New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, Esquire, Yale Review, Village Voice, Salon, Slate, McSweeney’s, and Believer. His work has been translated into twenty languages. Other People: Takes & Mistakes was published by Knopf in February.

 

Shelley Jackson is a writer and artist known for her cross-genre experiments, including her groundbreaking work of hyperfiction, Patchwork Girl (1995). She is author of two additional works of hyperfiction—My Body (1997) and The Doll Games (with Pamela Jackson, 2001). Jackson is author of six books including the 2006 novel Half Life, which won the 2006 James Tiptree, Jr. Award for science fiction and fantasy; the short story collection The Melancholy of Anatomy (2002); and three children’s books. In 2003 Jackson launched the Skin Project, a novella published exclusively in the form of tattoos on the skin of volunteers, one word at a time. She currently teaches in the graduate writing program at The New School in New York City and at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee.

 

Wayne Koestenbaum has published eighteen books of poetry, criticism, and fiction, including Notes on Glaze, The Pink Trance Notebooks, My 1980s & Other Essays, Hotel Theory, Best-Selling Jewish Porn Films, Andy Warhol, Humiliation, Jackie Under My Skin, and The Queen’s Throat (a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist). His essays and poetry have appeared in The Best American Essays, The Best American Poetry, The New York Times, The New Yorker, London Review of Books, Artforum, The Paris Review, Harper’s, The Believer, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Cabinet, and many other periodicals and anthologies.  Koestenbaum has had solo exhibitions of his paintings at White Columns (New York), 356 Mission (Los Angeles), and the University of Kentucky Art Museum.  He has given musical performances at the Centre Pompidou, Walker Art Center, The Kitchen, REDCAT, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art;  his first piano/vocal solo record, Lounge Act, will be issued by Ugly Duckling Presse Records in 2017.  He wrote the libretto for Michael Daughterty’s opera Jackie O, which has been performed around the world and has been released on DVD by Dynamic Italy. Winner of a Whiting Award, Koestenbaum has taught at Yale (in the English department as well as in the School of Art’s painting department), and is a Distinguished Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and French at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City.

 

Lucy Ives was born in New York City and earned her BA from Harvard College and her MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her first collection, the book-length poem Anamnesis (2009), won the Slope Editions Book Prize. She is also the author of the “brief novel” Nineties (2013); a poetry and essay collection, Orange Roses (2013); and a collection of poetry and prose including a novella, The Worldkillers (2014). Ives won an Iowa Arts Fellowship, as well as a MacCracken Fellowship. She is a former editor of Triple Canopy and lives in New York City, where she is completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. In February 2014, Ives was a featured writer for Harriet. Her novel Impossible Views of the World will be published later this year.