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Notes on Fiction: White Noise

Thursday December 5, 2013
07:30 pm

Tags: Event

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DEAD LANGUAGE performed their own original compositions, inspired by Don DeLillo's White Noise and written for this installment of Notes on Fiction.

 

About White Noise by Don DeLillo

Jack Gladney teaches Hitler studies at a liberal arts college in Middle America where his colleagues include New York expatriates who want to immerse themselves in "American magic and dread." Jack and his fourth wife, Babette, bound by their love, fear of death, and four ultramodern offspring, navigate the usual rocky passages of family life to the background babble of brand-name consumerism. Then a lethal black chemical cloud floats over their lives, an "airborne toxic event" unleashed by an industrial accident. The menacing cloud is a more urgent and visible version of the "white noise" engulfing the Gladney family--radio transmissions, sirens, microwaves, ultrasonic appliances, and TV murmerings--pulsing with life, yet heralding the danger of death.

 

DEAD LANGUAGE views musical creation as a process without boundaries. They identify themselves as more than instrumentalists; they are artists, composers, songwriters, curators, and improvisers. The members of DEAD LANGUAGE have composed electronic music for TrioDance Collective; co-founded and curate the non-profit Silicon Valley Music Festival; self-released albums of electronic music (Shackelton Gray) and cello and voice (Other People's Ghosts); performed as members of the Lucerne Festival Academy Orchestra, the Bang on a Can Summer Festival, and the Banff Centre; and collaborated with international jazz and improvisational artists. As an ensemble, DEAD LANGUAGE performs classics of their instrumentation's repertoire as well as those newly composed. Most recently, they premiered the work Glottophagy - a piece inspired by their namesake and representative of their mission - by American composer Mike Perdue, and performed this alongside Austrian composer Bernhard Lang's half-hour long work Differenz/Wiederholung 1