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New Literature from Europe Festival

Wednesday November 16, 2011
06:30 pm

Tags: Event

 

Video Part 2

 


 

Photos

 


 

The 8th Annual Festival of European Literature brings some of the best authors from across the pond to New York to share their work. This year the festival is entitled Crime Scene: Europe and is focusing on noir fiction. The festival hosts a wide array of events throughout the city in the third week of November, but on the 16th the authors will come together in two panels to discuss their work. Participating authors include Stefan Slupetzky (Austria), Caryl Ferey (France), Jan Costin Wagner (Germany), Zygmunt Miloszewski (Poland), Ana Maria Sandu (Romania), José Carlos Somoza (Spain) and Dan Fesperman (USA). Both panels will be moderated by Professor B. J. Rahn.

 

Panel 1 at 6:30pm:

Unconventional Police Protaganists

featuring  Caryl Ferey, Jan Costin Wagner, Stefan Slupetzky, and Dan Fesperman

with moderator B. J. Rahn

 

Panel 2 at 7:30pm:

The Nature of Evil

featuring Zygmunt Miłoszewski, Ana Maria Sandu, José Carlos Somoza, and Dan Fesperman with moderator B. J. Rahn

 

Stefan Slupetzky (b. 1962 in Vienna) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and worked as musician, coatroom attendant and arts teacher before he turned to writing. He wrote and illustrated more than a dozen children’s books and received several awards. Today, Slupetzky writes fiction for adults, and has produced an array of plays, short stories, novels and song-lyrics. Since 2006 he has been adapting prose fiction by Stefan Zweig and Arthur Schnitzler for the stage at one of Austria’s most renowned summer stock festivals, the Festspiele Reichenau. Slupetzky received a number of European literary awards, e.g. the Friedrich-Glauser-Preis, the Burgdorfer Krimipreis, the Radio-Bremen-Krimipreis, and the Leo-Perutz-Preis. In 2009 his novel Der Fall des Lemming (The Case of Lemming) was adapted for the screen. In 2010 Stefan Slupetzky founded Trio Lepschi, an ensemble that focuses on the performance of traditional "Wienerlieder" (Viennese Songs), and has since toured extensively with the band.

 

Caryl Ferey was born in Caen, France in 1967. In 1989, he goes on a world tour and falls in love with New Zealand. In 1994, he publishes his first novel Avec un ange sur les yeux. In 1995 he writes and publishes his first crime novel Delicta Mortalia – Péché Mortel in which Detective Mc Cash appears for the first time – he will then carry out the investigations in Plutôt Crever, Série Noire Gallimard, 2002 and La jambe gauche de Joe Strummer, Série Noire Gallimard, 2007. In 2008, he publishes Zulu – his first novel to be translated into English (Europa 2010): a huge success both in France and abroad. It is his third novel and second crime novel which makes him famous and starts his career as a French crime novelist. His trademark is the change of scenery. Being himself a great traveler, the writer locates his novels – among which Zulu and Utu – all around the world: from New Zealand where he lived for some time, to Morocco, through France or South Africa. His novels are also inspired by rock culture as shown in La Jambe gauche de Joe Strummer, which refers directly to his passion for The Clash. With D’amour et dope fraîche he writes his own contribution to the famous French detective collection ‘Le Poulpe’. He also writes children books such as Krotokus 1er Roi des Animaux (Pocket, 2010).

 

Author and musician Jan Costin Wagner’s novels have been translated into 14 languages. His first novel, Nachtfahrt, was awarded the Marlowe Prize for the best crime novel in 2002 and the author was praised by the jury as having "defined new borders for the genre." The American edition of Eismond, Ice Moon, was nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 2008, the same year in which Das Schweigen was awarded the German Krimipreis, the German Critics Award for Crime Fiction. The English translation of Das Schweigen, Silence, will be published by Pegasus Books in November 2011. Jan Costin Wagner, born in 1972, makes his home near Frankfurt, but Finland, the site of his novels featuring police commissioner Kimmo Joentaa, is his second homeland.

 

Zygmunt Miłoszewski (b. 1975, Warsaw), was a reporter and editor for Newsweek. His first novel, The Intercom, was published in 2005 to high acclaim. In 2006 he published his novel for young readers, The Adder Mountains, and in 2007 the crime novel Entanglement, published in English by Bitter Lemon Press in 2010. A film of Entanglement (dir. Jacek Bromski), screenplay by Miłoszewski, was released in Poland in 2011. He has written a sequel to Entanglement called Grain of Truth, also featuring Teodor Szacki, which Bitter Lemon Press will publish in 2012.

 

Ana Maria Sandu (b. 1974, living and working in Bucharest) published in 2003 From the Memories of a Chelbasan (Paralela 45 Publishing House), a complex epical poem, nominated for various important Romanian prizes. This book was published in French in 2010 by Chemin de Fer Publishing House. In 2006, her novel The Girl From the Oblong House, a cruel story about identity, was published by Polirom Publishing House, to great critical acclaim. It was followed in 2010 by her novel Kill me! (Polirom). The Girl From the Oblong House and Kill me! are due for publication in Italian by Aisara Publishing House in 2012. Ana Maria Sandu is also been a prolific journalist, covering literature, cinema, music and urban culture for top Romanian magazines. Sandu also contributed to several important literary and art projects such as 100 to watch, Love 13, Rumänien heute (Passagen Verlag, 2011), and is the programmer of the documentary film section of Transilvania International Film Festival in Cluj Napoca, Romania, and member of the jury of the HBO Romania annual screenplay contest.

 

José Carlos Somoza was born in Havana, Cuba, in 1959, but since 1960 has lived in Spain and is now a Spanish citizen. He graduated from medical school in 1994, specializing in psychiatry, but decided to leave the profession to devote himself to writing. He is considered one of the most innovative authors of mystery and fantasy literature in Spanish, with works that seek to break the gender barrier. His work has been translated into over thirty languages, and he has participated in many festivals and conferences in Spain and abroad. He is the author of eleven novels, and has published short stories and several plays, as well. He lives in Madrid with his wife and two children.

 

A former foreign correspondent and the author of seven novels, Dan Fesperman's travels as a writer have taken him to more than thirty countries and three war zones. A 1994 trip to the besieged city of Sarajevo inspired his first two novels, Lie in the Dark and The Small Boat of Great Sorrows, which won Dagger awards in Great Britain. His novel The Prisoner of Guantanamo won the Dashiell Hammett Award from the International Crime Writers Association. He now lives in Baltimore, and has just completed his eighth novel, The Double Game.

 

Professor B. J. Rahn teaches English literature at Hunter College in New York. She has been teaching, researching, and writing about crime fiction for over two decades. In addition, she gives courses at the Renaissance academy in Naples, Florida. She has published articles in journals and reference books such as The Armchair Detective, St. James Guide to Crime and Mystery Writing, Scribner's Mystery and Suspense Writers: The Literature of Crime, Detection, and Espionage, The Dictionary of Literary Biography and the Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing. Professor Rahn also leads detective walking tours. In the UK, the tours visit sites in the lives and fiction of authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle, Dorothy L. Sayers, Agatha Christie, and Margery Allingham. In the USA, the tours feature New York authors Dashiell Hammett, Rex Stout, Linda Fairstein and Edgar Allan Poe. Virtual tours are available as slide lectures. She is a member of the Mystery Writers of America, the Crime Writers Association in the UK as well as the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, the Dorothy L. Sayers Society, and the Margery Allingham Society.